Can’t Stop Saying “Um” or “Uh”? You’re Not Alone …

I was quoted in a popular article in Quartz on learning how to use filler words better. (UPDATE: My comments on filler words also were published in New York Magazine and Lifehacker.) Here is an excerpt: This is not a new phenomenon (the earliest use has been dated back to 1469), and it’s not exclusive to the English language. Filler words “appear in every language and every culture,” says Steven D. Cohen, an assistant professor of communication at the University of Baltimore. The English um, for example, has a Korean equivalent, eum and a French counterpart, euh. According...

The Secret to Stop Saying “Um” and Other Filler Words

I was interviewed for an article in BBC News on eliminating filler words in business conversations and meetings. Here is an excerpt: “We are so comfortable with our own vocal tendencies that we often overlook them,” said Steven Cohen, assistant professor of communication at the University of Baltimore in the US … Learn to diagnose your own “filler word hotspots” to better anticipate the changes you need to make to your speech, Cohen said. Often, people use fillers at the beginning or end of a sentence or while transitioning from one thought to the next, he explained. Being especially...

Body Language and Communication in the Presidential Race

I was interviewed for an article in Baltimore Magazine on the impact of communication and body language in the presidential race. Here is an excerpt: Carson’s soft-spoken, “low-key” demeanor, derided by some, and regularly by MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough, a conservative former GOP Florida congressman, and Trump, of course, is often mistaken for a lack of leadership ability, according to the University of Baltimore’s Steven D. Cohen. “Carson says his soft-spokenness is a strength, not a weakness and that’s a quote I’ve clipped out and shared with my students,” Cohen says. “I was...

Speak Up: Why You Should Take a Public Speaking Class

I was interviewed for an article in Slate on the importance of taking a public speaking class. As Nicholas Duchesne (who took one of my courses) explains in the article, “a public speaking class can help you land a job or deliver a punch line.” Here is an excerpt: “Public speaking affects your academic, personal, and professional lives,” says Steven D. Cohen, a communications professor at the University of Baltimore who has also taught at the University of Maryland and Harvard. He is proof of the poise that training in public speaking can provide. No ums, uhs, or likes...

Presenting Like a Pro: 7 Tips for Powerful Public Speaking

I offer some tips and tricks on speaking like a pro in the December issue of Student Health 101. Here is an excerpt of the article: Nail-biting? Check. Unavoidable? Check. Public speaking is likely in your future, whether you’ll be making a classroom presentation to your peers, giving a speech in an auditorium, or introducing a public event. Developing presentation skills enhances your academic, personal, and career opportunities (and also protects your nails). To learn more, read “Like a Pro: 7 Tips for Powerful Public Speaking.” Be sure to check out the...

Ready to Be Amazed? How I Got the Nickname “Magic Man”

I invite you to learn about my interest in magic in the latest issue of University of Baltimore Magazine. After reading the article, make sure to check out the Web Extra. Who knows? I may have a trick or two up my sleeve. Here is an excerpt of the article: All it took to get Steven D. Cohen hooked on magic was a simple card trick. Since that moment, he has used magic to connect with others—from being the new kid at school to breaking the ice with students in his current role as assistant professor in the Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences’ Klein Family School of Communications Design. Never one to...